Who’s That Hominin? The mystery of Homo naledi

Almost everyone has been the “new kid” at some point in their life. And, we can probably all agree that whether it was in a new school, neighborhood, on a sports team, etc., being the new kid meant everyone was interested in you. But, why are we so interesting as the new kid? As someone who is unknown to a group, the new kid enkindles curiosity, which encourages others to better understand them so they can be comfortably classified into a form of the taxonomic system. Likewise, every few years a new hominin fossil typically emerges, and the rush to classify this “new kid” begins among paleoanthropologists. Recently, the discovery of Homo naledi (H. naledi) has led researchers to attempt to classify and place it within the context of our lineage.

Lucy’s Paleo Diet: How teeth reveal important insight into early hominin diet

So, you’re at the dentist office. While sitting in the waiting room, you pick up one of the many magazines. On the cover, is a title heralding a new dietary trend; the Paleo Diet. It may read “Eat like a Caveman” or “Paleo diet 101”. We see such titles everywhere as the paleo diet has gained enormous popularity in the western world. Often boasting staggering, stupendous, incredible health benefits, the paleo diet attempts to return us to the food our early ancestors consumed. However, many of the paleo diets we see in books and magazines are only loosely based on actual hominin diets. But, how are these paleo diets compiled when the generation they refer to has been gone for a few million years? Well, paleoanthropologists have been able to delve into the hominin diet by observing dental adaptations left behind by our early ancestors, documenting and cataloging information on early hominin diet.